Since beginning this class, my daily online routine has changed considerably.  Mostly in length.  I used to check both of my personal email accounts, check Facebook and then check my University account.  Then I would maybe check my online banking, but that was about it.  Now, I check both of my personal email accounts mostly looking for blog comment notifications, check my Google Reader and post feedback as necessary, check Facebook, check twitter casually note any mentions or retweets, check Google Analytics someone from Brisbane stopped by for like 3 seconds - no big deal, and then tweet/like/share my blog post from the night before.  I go through this cycle, minus the blog share and Analytics, several times a day.  I find all kinds of inspiration through my connections that I come back to throughout my day.

Tonight I was patrolling my twitter feed and came across a tweet by @davecormier, Manager of Web Communications and Innovations at the University of Prince Edward Island and Principal of Edactive Technologies.  Dean had invited Dave to drop by one of our live sessions a few weeks back, with the hopes of connecting our class with Dave's because he teaches a similarly themed course in PEI.  That is how I came to know of Dave and his tweets.  Tonight he posted a link to his son's blog who was wanting to know how people use their computers.  So I moseyed on over and discovered that Dave's blogging son is six.  And that he creates podcasts about dinosaurs because that is something he is really into.  I gave his show a listen and was totally blown away.  Just give episode three of Charlottetownosaurus a watch and you'll see why:
Oscar's enthusiasm about Mesozoic times makes my heart smile.  He is using words I don't even know and is spouting off facts like they are common knowledge.  To me, this is proof that when we teach to student interests and strengths, powerful and meaningful learning experiences will ensue.  And how about providing him the opportunity to share his expertise in an exciting way?  Who wouldn't want to host their very own show to be broadcasted on their very own blog?  Children never cease to inspire me with their capabilities! This makes me so excited to begin my internship, so I can find out what interests my little learners and plan meaningful ways to engage them in digging deeper to find out more.  So thank you, Dave, for being such an awesome dad and encouraging your son to pursue his interests.  And a big thank you to Oscar for teaching me a thing or twelve about dinosaurs!

You can check out more of Oscar's work here.
 


Comments

JaneBrundige
06/14/2012 1:37pm

This is awesome. Such an amazing example of the capabilities that our students have if we give them the power to explore. Not only does this show the power of teaching to students interests but also the power of technology in the classroom. I guarantee that at six, Oscar would not be able to write or draw the amount of information in level of detail that he has provided in this video. What an amazing way to document student learning.

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06/14/2012 2:15pm

I agree, Jane. Dave actually sent me a link for a letter he wrote to Oscar, apologizing for the type of questioning he used. He felt that he could have further encouraged his son's learning by asking him to consider some other possibilities about the "false" dinosaurs instead of sticking to what he already knew. I think that being able to look back at learning experiences, in digital format, also allows us to reflect on our practices in a way that just isn't possible without. You can read about it here www.davecormier.com/edblog/2011/11/18/explaining-rhizomatic-learning-to-my-five-year-old. Thanks for the comment!

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